Home » Publications » Catalogue of Publications » Local power Struggles, Conflicts and Conflicts Resolution. The causes, Dynamics and Policy Implications of Land-related Conflicts in the Greater Accra and Eastern Regions of Ghana

Local power Struggles, Conflicts and Conflicts Resolution. The causes, Dynamics and Policy Implications of Land-related Conflicts in the Greater Accra and Eastern Regions of Ghana

Jospeh R. A. Ayee, Alex K. D. Frempong, Richard Asante & Kwame Boafo-Arthur. Local power Struggles, Conflicts and Conflicts Resolution. The causes, Dynamics and Policy Implications of Land-related Conflicts in the Greater Accra and Eastern Regions of Ghana. dakar, CODESRIA, Research Reports n°3, 2011, 31 p., ISBN 978-2-86978-489-5

Ghana appears an oasis of peace in a sub-region which over the last one and half decades has been better known for violent civil conflict than democracy and development. Behind this smokescreen of stability, however, there have been various forms of local conflicts some of which have turned violent. Indeed some of these violent local conflicts preceded independence and have waxed and waned with the politics of the time. But perhaps the intriguing thing is that none has assumed national dimension thus far.

Land is an asset and a resource with economic, political, social and cultural ramifications. An important problem of land tenure systems is endemic conflict, which has involved chiefs, family heads, government, individuals and groups in various permutations. The endemic nature of most of these conflicts suggests they are embedded in local power structures and social group membership. Land conflicts entail many political, economic and social costs, including the costs of policing conflicts, loss of life, livelihoods and property, displacement and social and economic insecurity. Among several initiatives taken to address the conflicts and their underlying causes are an alternative dispute resolution system and the Land Administration Project of 2003, which to date is the most comprehensive programme. This initiative has not been able to solve the problem of land management and its associated conflicts.

As a contribution to the continuing debate over land tenure and its associated conflicts in Ghana, this study analyses the causes of some of the conflicts in selected towns in the Greater Accra and the eastern regions. It examines the role of the actors, the dynamics of land tenure, the conflict resolution mechanisms especially the role played by traditional institutions and makes policy recommendations.

This publication is a research report to the Consortium for Development Partnerships (CDP) jointly coordinated by the Northwestern University , Evanston, USA and the Council for the Development of Social Science Research in Africa (CODESRIA), Dakar, Senegal, during the first phase (2004-2008). The second phase (2009-2012) is under the coordination of CODESRIA and the African Studies Center, Leiden, The Netherlands). The CDP Secretariat is currently hosted by CODESRIA.

Authors

Joseph R. A. Ayee is a Professor of Political Science and Public Administration, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.
Alex K. D. Frempong is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Political Science, University of Ghana, Legon.
Richard Asante is a Research Fellow at the Institute of African Studies, University of Ghana, Legon
Kwame Boafo-Arthur is a Professor in the Department of Political Science, University of Ghana, Legon.

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